Monday, 8 June 2009

European Election - Voting Figures

Accessing the Electoral Commission - as the 'authoritative' source for the final voting figures - one is directed by link to the BBC - our 'independent' broadcasting organisation, which now seems to operate as a 'mouthpiece' governmental quango, but I digress......

Bearing in mind that the governing party polled 2,381,760 votes, just 15.7% of the total votes cast; then factor in the 'anti-EU' votes which comprise UKIP, BNP, English Democrats, Socialist Labour Party, NO2EU and UK First, which together polled 4,121,983 votes, 27.2%, the Labour Party can hardly be said to have a mandate when deciding a major aspect of this country's policy on membership of the European Union.

More importantly, the Conservative Party - which has the stated aim of maintaining said membership - which polled 4,198,394 votes, 27.7% of the total votes cast, may well state that they polled the majority of votes but then can hardly consider that as a mandate, being just 0.5% greater. This is, it is believed, justifiably a 'false' majority when it must be accepted that not all those who would have voted in a referendum, on an in/out question, had voted. This point, when factored into the equation, leaves the Conservative Party in the same position as the Labour Party - ie, without a mandate.

Just another thought..........

5 comments:

Steve Halden said...

The anti-EU vote was split between too many parties.

Most of them believe the same as UKIP. (Excluding BNP)

The anti-EU candidates should join up with UKIP and fight against the EU together.

wonkotsane said...

The problem is, half of them are just anti-Farage parties.

AProlefrom1984 said...

You're right, wonkotsane. I've noticed the anti-Farage sentiments. I don't get it. He seems a genuinely decent chap who speaks his mind. You'd think people would welcome the chance to save UK from disaster via a very articulate person who connects with ordinary members of the public. this is why I'll never understand politics.

The Democracy Movement said...

This election was an overwhelming 'No' to the Lisbon Treaty. All the anti-Lisbon parties together - Conservatives, UKIP, Libertas, No2EU, Greens etc. - polled over 63% of the vote. The treaty relates both to problems of trust between politicians and public (considering broken manifesto promises over a referendum) and the degradation of the standing of Parliament. Gordon Brown must now deliver on that clear public demand at the looming EU summit on 18-19 June - by rescinding Britain's ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. Once again failing to connect with voters, at this extra-sensitive time for public faith in our democratic system, will truly seal both his fate and that of the Labour party.

John Rotherham said...

Whilst I agree with the sentiment of the DM's proposal can you really believe that Gordon will tell the 'colleagues' that he wishes now to reverse the ratification by the UK? Or even tell them that he now has overwhelming public opinion to give us a referendum on this Treaty?
He just hasn't the balls.